Strategies and Resources for Showcasing your Work Online

Virtually no one can say that they are not engaged with some form of social media or technology and employers and graduate schools are no different. In fact, many employers and graduate schools look at candidates with online portfolios. While students in all majors should consider creating an online version of their résumé or portfolio, it is critical for students looking to enter into creative and design fields such as art, illustration/graphic design, photography, and digital media & design, to name just a few. Creative résumés and portfolios can also help one stand out especially in a design-oriented field.

Check out these examples of creative résumés to get you thinking about ideas for your own:

Reference these websites for developing an online portfolio:

Let’s not forget about other ways to get examples of your work visible online! Make a website, share your photography work, or start a blog to highlight your creative written skills.

Basic Website- Aboutme, Wix

So you ask, what do I include in my online portfolio or résumé?

  • Bio/About me: Introduce yourself, your skills, your aspirations
  • Résumé: Highlight industry-specific skills while showing your creativity
  • Sample work: Samples of art work, paintings, designs – show what you can do
  • Blog Posts: If you are entering a creative writing field, a blog can showcase your skills
  • Recommendations: Direct quotes from fellow team members, supervisors, professors, clients
  • Contact Information: Many sites include a contact box; links to your other social media pages… LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest

Keep in mind that you can keep this simple by letting your work speak for itself. Also, make sure you know your industry, understanding your target audience and the appropriateness of what you share for all to see. Lastly, view others’ websites in doing your research and utilize your professors, supervisors, and other experts in your field to help you.

The National Portfolio Day Association can also be a great resource for current undergraduates and those who wish to pursue graduate work!

 

I’d like to acknowledge Emily Merritt, Career Consultant to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences here at UConn for her research and contributions on this topic.

By Jennifer Grunwald
Jennifer Grunwald Career Consultant, School of Fine Arts Jennifer Grunwald